Top 10: Colourful Packaging Designs

Think Tank selected ten packages that have been using colour not only to stand out on the shelves but also to communicate the product's features and give it a more approachable look focusing on pastel colour schemes and colour-blocking.

1.

From Tea Bag to Tea Box

The Teabox monogrammed tea branding is designed to reflect the simplicity of the shipping process the company offers and the promise that the premium loose leaf tea is sent out to shoppers within 48-hours of it being freshly made. This mission statement is reflected in the conveyed in the product's simplistic and compact packaging design featuring sleek typefaces and a bold use of colour. Teabox teamed up with design brand Pentagram to design its branding that is straight-forward, effortlessly tasteful and fuss-free. The teas are packaged in tiny circular pods and encased in sleek boxes with nothing more than the brand's logo and the product's name printed on the front. The stripped-down aesthetic of the packaging reflects the simplified shipping process and quality of ensuring consumers have the freshest product possible.

Designed by Fast Code Design

 

2.

Eat Colour Vegetable Hues

The 'Eat Color' packaging concept developed by student Kim Gyeongah of Hoseo University in South Korea uses colour as the means to highlight and brand the product. Eat Color is a line of dried vegetable snacks, which are ideal for snacking on throughout the year, no matter what's in season. By adopting a diet where you focus on eating a variety of coloured fruits and vegetables, the richness of the various means that you're also getting a balanced diet from the different nutrients each differently coloured fruit naturally has. For this project, the Eat Color snacks are packaged in small burlap sacks and differentiated by labels that highlight the colours the products were before the drying process. This includes a vibrant yellow, white, red and a green.

Designed by Kim Gyeongah

 

3.

"Vibe" Tea Packaging

Vibe Was Designed in Response to a Preference in Russian Tea Over Vodka. Inspired by the colours and shapes of a music equalizer, Moscow's Jekyll Hyde Agency developed Vibe, a cool, colourful and hip tea packaging system specifically for music festivals and nightclubs. The tea box itself is white and the vibrancy of the design comes from the individual tea packets themselves, which are arranged in subtle gradating patterns. As well as being highly aesthetically pleasing as a whole, each individual tea packet's colour is representative of its type, such as Red, Brown, Black, Mint or Milk tea.

Designed by Jekyll Hyde Agency

 

4.

Colour-Coded Supplement Packaging

Wojo Nutrition's natural supplements are presented in colour-coded packs that each represents a different brain function or health benefit. Whether used to calm common anxieties, boost energy or compensate for not enough sun exposure, these supplement packages are each equipped with miniature vials of liquid. Each serving is meant to last users one week or can be spread out for moments where energy or focus is required. While Wojo Nutrition's calm supplements can be incorporated with one's morning cup of coffee or into a fruit smoothie, its sun supplements boast a healthy dose of essential D3 vitamins that not only enhance one's mood but also aid in boosting the look of one's complexion. These colour-coded supplement packs are simple, contemporary and visually bold, drawing consumers in with a strategic use of bright hues.

Product by Wojo Nutrition

 

5.

The Splitz Popsicle

Splitz Popsicle's brand identity is visually pleasing and features popsicle packaging with graphic and geometric details. The Chicago-based brand offers treats that are as aesthetically pleasing as they are tasty featuring three flavours that are designed for the health-conscious consumer with a sweet tooth. Made from the finest imported fruits, these hand-crafted and hand-poured treats feature popsicle packaging that is artistic and bold. In addition to its bright colours, the packaging displays nutritional information and an artisanal ingredient list that will make an act of indulging more guilt-free for those who are serious about their health. While most store-bought popsicles can be notorious for high sugar content, these frozen treats are a healthy alternative and are marketed to appeal to design lovers.

Designed by UCO Design

 

6.

Oh Fudge! Vibrant Packaging 

This vibrant fudge branding strategy would never go unnoticed on the shop shelf. For the graphics, the colours and the typography work together to create an in-your-face aesthetic splash. Designed in-house at Aesop, Oh Fudge! packaging is much unlike the clean and muted design scheme that the consumer might expect from the company. Here is proof of the creative team's versatility. Three flavours of chocolate bars include Apple & Cinnamon, Caramel & Sea Salt and Chilli & Chocolate and each one is decorated in a different but equally punchy way. Respectively, arrowed apples, schools of fish and clusters of penguins mark each little carton, rendered in bright orange, cherry red, neon green and turquoise. Curvy hand lettering is smooth and thick, serving up the friendly exclamation that's the name of the treat.

Designed by Aesop Agency

 

7.

Hnina Bold Packaging

Hnina packaging plainly describes its contents in a way that makes dessert desirable for an unexpected reason. The cartons read "Healthy Dark Chocolate" in bold type to quell any suspicions about the negative implications of eating the treats. Isabela Rodrigues of Sweety Branding Studio was working to frame organic chocolates in a wholesome light. The cases were left largely as untreated brown card to communicate the natural quality of the ingredients. Brightly coloured contouring boxes make the products pop. And finally, Hnina packaging's prominent presentation of the health claim in the fluorescent script makes it difficult for any sugar addict to argue. It's enough to convince you to swap your veggies for something sweeter.

Designed by Sweety Branding Studio

 

8.

"Tech Will Save Us" DIY Kits

Based in the UK, tech startup "Technology Will Save Us" is offering education toy kits designed by Burgopak to create new packaging. The new venture aims to give anybody the chance to learn and create (specifically in the realms of tech and design) with DIY Gadget Kits that encourage you to code. The company provides vehicles for learning that not only integrate technology and coding but also encourage inventiveness and play at the same time. The packaging design for the educational toy kits reflects this duality of fun and education. Inspired by old LEGOs, the front flap on larger packs intentionally shows people the exciting contents within. The colour-blocking design is simplistic with a retro throwback.

Designed by Burgopak

 

9.

'Atmosphere' Tea Company Packaging

Brazil-based Designer Paloma Martins created this earthy tea packaging design for the 'Atmosphere' tea company. The fresh packaging is solely focused on conveying a pure, simple and earthy tone. Each canister of tea follows the same simple labelling format. The bottom of the tea can is a solid coloured line, which ranges from sunshine yellow to deep sea blue. The majority of the can is wrapped in a beige wrapper with the name of the tea flavour and a signature illustration. For example, 'Calm Sea' is labelled with a bird that appears to be floating atop a calm body of water. Each tea is then topped with a black lid, which is branded with the Atmosphere logo. This logo is an illustration of a cartoon-like triangular pine tree.

Designed by Paloma Martins

 

10.

Kleenex Desktop Companions 

Many brands of facial tissues come with some sort of stock ornamentation designed to vaguely match any buyer's interior decor. However, despite efforts to embellish these cardboard boxes, the majority of the patterns and images printed fail to inspire the admiration of some graphic designers. As a creative individual who falls into this category, Chris Yoon endeavoured to conceive these Kleenex Desktop Companions which would better integrate the two primary parts of the expendable object. He began with three different concepts which playfully give an aesthetic function to the two-ply hankies that are dispensed. Three endearing kleenex boxes with inward-angled faces have been illustrated to represent a house, a typewriter and a whale. Respectively, the issued tissues act as chimney smoke, sheets of paper and water spraying from a blowhole.

Designed by Chris Yoon

[Source: Trend Hunter]

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